Rohingya: "I'm Better Than Before, But Inside My Heart Lies So Much Pain": ROHWOM_ASJ_27

Deluder peeks through a hole from her shelter into her shop that her 12 year old daughter is running.Dildar Begum, 25, and her daughter Nur Kalima, 12 run a shop in Hakimpara camp. Her husband and other children were brutally killed in Myanmar. The money to open the shop was donated by a journalist who visited her. {quote}I'm better than before but inside my heart there lies so much pain. The extra money helps buy them vegetables and fish. Her daughter goes to the madrassa in the morning and runs the shop in the afternoons. {quote}I feel shy to be in front of other people. People will say I'm doing bad things. In our community women can't be outside and in front of people. My daughter runs this shop.{quote} After her daughter gets older and married she wont let her run the shop. She plans to just do sewing then. {quote}I have lost all my kids and my husband. In my mind there is no peace. This is Bangladesh, not my own country. We are provided with the things we need but it feels like nothing because this is not our own country. If we are given our rights we will go back, we can have a peaceful live. There is a lot of sadness in my heart. If Allah killed me I would be happy. I've seen a lot of people killed and I’ve been suffering here a lot.“ Her daughter Nur Kalima would rather be in school {quote}I can take an education anywhere I go. I cant take this shop anywhere.’ — Dildar fled to Bangladesh shortly after the August 25th attack from Tula Toli village in Myanmar. She says that one day the military came and opened fired on her village and stormed into her house. They took her husband out of the house and to the riverbank and shot him. Then they came back into her house and grabbed her baby from her arms and stabbed him in the head. They killed another one of her children by cutting his throat, and another by beating her over the head with a rifle. 2 military held her arms while another raped her. They then beat her and she pretended to be dead. When they left, they set her house on fire. Her 10 year old daughter, Nurkalima, was severely injured when the military beat her over the head with the blades of machetes, but she helped her mom crawl past the burning bodies of her children and out of the burning house. For 5 days she hid in the hills and when the military left, she went back to Tula Toli on her way to the Bangladesh border. All that was left of her village was smoke and ask where houses used to be. There were bodies everywhere, so many that they were uncountable. She came across some men who carried her for two days to the border, where they were able to cross into Bangladesh by boat. {quote}I want justice. My kids were killed, I want justice for them.{quote} she says

Deluder peeks through a hole from her shelter into her shop that her 12 year old daughter is running.

Dildar Begum, 25, and her daughter Nur Kalima, 12 run a shop in Hakimpara camp. Her husband and other children were brutally killed in Myanmar. The money to open the shop was donated by a journalist who visited her. "I'm better than before but inside my heart there lies so much pain. The extra money helps buy them vegetables and fish. Her daughter goes to the madrassa in the morning and runs the shop in the afternoons. "I feel shy to be in front of other people. People will say I'm doing bad things. In our community women can't be outside and in front of people. My daughter runs this shop." After her daughter gets older and married she wont let her run the shop. She plans to just do sewing then. "I have lost all my kids and my husband. In my mind there is no peace. This is Bangladesh, not my own country. We are provided with the things we need but it feels like nothing because this is not our own country. If we are given our rights we will go back, we can have a peaceful live. There is a lot of sadness in my heart. If Allah killed me I would be happy. I've seen a lot of people killed and I’ve been suffering here a lot.“ Her daughter Nur Kalima would rather be in school "I can take an education anywhere I go. I cant take this shop anywhere.’ — Dildar fled to Bangladesh shortly after the August 25th attack from Tula Toli village in Myanmar. She says that one day the military came and opened fired on her village and stormed into her house. They took her husband out of the house and to the riverbank and shot him. Then they came back into her house and grabbed her baby from her arms and stabbed him in the head. They killed another one of her children by cutting his throat, and another by beating her over the head with a rifle. 2 military held her arms while another raped her. They then beat her and she pretended to be dead. When they left, they set her house on fire. Her 10 year old daughter, Nurkalima, was severely injured when the military beat her over the head with the blades of machetes, but she helped her mom crawl past the burning bodies of her children and out of the burning house. For 5 days she hid in the hills and when the military left, she went back to Tula Toli on her way to the Bangladesh border. All that was left of her village was smoke and ask where houses used to be. There were bodies everywhere, so many that they were uncountable. She came across some men who carried her for two days to the border, where they were able to cross into Bangladesh by boat. "I want justice. My kids were killed, I want justice for them." she says