Rohingya: "I'm Better Than Before, But Inside My Heart Lies So Much Pain": ROHWOM_ASJ_18

Razia Sultana was born in Myanmar but is a Bangladesh citizen. She grew up in Chittagong in the tight knit Rohingya community. Her dream was always to be a barrister but after she was married her husbands family didn't approve of her studying further. {quote}My life is full of struggle{quote} She and her family were involved with the Rohingya activist groups ARNO and BRC, and in 2009 the Bangladesh government shut the organizations down. Two of her family members were put in jail and into exile abroad. {quote}The influx broke me totally. I was sick and traumatized and full of feat in my heart. I couldn't control myself. My friends and family asked me what I wanted and I said that I have to do something for women. That was the start. I gave up everything to work for my nation, to get them their rights, their human rights. What's been going on is wrong.{quote}  She has since trained hundreds of women in livelihood and literacy training. {quote}There is no life in the camps, they have become a burden for the world. If there is no skills training, no education, they will become subhumans! They’re deprived of all opportunities and denied a normal life. They will become desperate and you can't blame them or anybody , it's like you're creating a bomb! They're frustrated and cant think wrong or right. We have to prevent this, we have to solve the issue of going back, you cant keep them in Bangladesh, this isn't their land.”

Razia Sultana was born in Myanmar but is a Bangladesh citizen. She grew up in Chittagong in the tight knit Rohingya community. Her dream was always to be a barrister but after she was married her husbands family didn't approve of her studying further. "My life is full of struggle" She and her family were involved with the Rohingya activist groups ARNO and BRC, and in 2009 the Bangladesh government shut the organizations down. Two of her family members were put in jail and into exile abroad. "The influx broke me totally. I was sick and traumatized and full of feat in my heart. I couldn't control myself. My friends and family asked me what I wanted and I said that I have to do something for women. That was the start. I gave up everything to work for my nation, to get them their rights, their human rights. What's been going on is wrong." She has since trained hundreds of women in livelihood and literacy training. "There is no life in the camps, they have become a burden for the world. If there is no skills training, no education, they will become subhumans! They’re deprived of all opportunities and denied a normal life. They will become desperate and you can't blame them or anybody , it's like you're creating a bomb! They're frustrated and cant think wrong or right. We have to prevent this, we have to solve the issue of going back, you cant keep them in Bangladesh, this isn't their land.”